Ventura county, Southern California 2016-12-29T16:18:07-08:00

Choose your city in Ventura county, California!

Starting in the mid-1900s, there was a large growth in population in the East County, moving from the San Fernando Valley in Los Angeles and out into the Conejo and Simi Valleys. Part of the Conejo Valley belongs to Los Angeles County. This part consists of Calabasas, Hidden Hills, Agoura Hills, Agoura, and Westlake Village. The other half of the Conejo Valley, which belongs to Ventura County, consists of Lake Sherwood, Hidden Valley, Oak Park, Thousand Oaks, and Newbury Park, which was formerly an unincorporated area that is now the most westerly part of Thousand Oaks.
Parts of the county are on the Oxnard Plain which includes the cities of Oxnard, Camarillo, Port Hueneme and much of Ventura. Other cities and communities lie in the intermountain valleys of the Transverse Range. The Santa Clara River Valley is the most prominent valley, while other valleys include Conejo Valley, Simi Valley, Santa Rosa Valley, Tierra Rejada Valley and Las Posas Valley. Other parts of the county are on small coastal mountains, such as the Santa Ynez Mountains, Simi Hills, Santa Monica Mountains and the Piru Mountains. Most of the population of Ventura County lives in the southern portion of the county. The major population centers are the Oxnard Plain and the Simi and Conejo Valleys. In local media, the county is usually split between the eastern portion, generally associated with the San Fernando Valley, and the western portion, often referred to as “Oxnard-Ventura.”
The 2010 United States Census reported that Ventura County had a population of 823,318.
The racial makeup of Ventura County was 565,804 (68.7%) White, 15,163 (1.8%) African American, 8,068 (1.0%) Native American, 55,446 (6.7%) Asian, 1,643 (0.2%) Pacific Islander, 140,253 (17.0%) from other races, and 36,941 (4.5%) from two or more races.
Hispanic or Latino of any race were 331,567 persons (40.3%).
Oxnard Airport, just west of Downtown Oxnard and was Ventura County’s only commercial airport, it now no longer takes public flights. It is also the county’s largest airport.
Camarillo Airport, formerly a US Air Force Base, is a general aviation airport located south of the City of Camarillo. It is the current base of operations of the Ventura County Sheriff’s Department Aviation Unit and the home of the VCSD’s Training Facility and Academy, the Ventura County Criminal Justice Training Center. The Camarillo Airport also serves as the base of operations for the Ventura County Fire Department and facilitates the Oxnard College Regional Fire Academy and the Ventura County Reserve Officers Training Center.
Santa Paula Airport is a privately owned airport; however, it is open to the public for general aviation.
Ventura County is served by Amtrak and Metrolink trains along the main coast rail line, as well as Greyhound Lines, Gold Coast Transit (formerly South Coast Area Transit), and VISTA buses. The cities of Camarillo, Moorpark, Simi Valley and Thousand Oaks have their own small bus systems.
Park authorized commercial service operators provide access to the five islands of Channel Islands National Park.

Simi Valley

Simi Valley

Area
Total: 42.247 sq mi
Land: 41.480 sq mi
Water: 0.767 sq mi

Population (2010)
Total: 124,237
Density: 2,900/sq mi

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Thousand Oaks

Thousand Oaks

Area
Total: 55.181 sq mi
Land: 55.031 sq mi
Water: 0.150 sq mi

Population (2010)
Total: 126,683
Density: 2,300/sq mi

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Westlake Village

Westlake Village

Area
Total: 5.509 sq mi
Land: 5.185 sq mi
Water: 0.320 sq mi

Population (2010)
Total: 8,270
Density: 1,500/sq mi

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Oxnard

Oxnard

Area
Total: 39.208 sq mi
Land: 26.894 sq mi
Water: 12.314 sq mi

Population (2010)
Total: 207,254
Density: 7,358/sq mi

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Lake county, Southern California 2016-12-18T09:23:53-08:00

Choose your city in Lake county, California!

Lake County was formed in 1861 from parts of Napa and Mendocino counties, but the area had European-American settlers from at least the 1840s. Lake County has long been known as a farming community.
The 1911 California Blue Book lists the major crops as Bartlett pears and beans. Other crops include grain, alfalfa, hay, prunes, peaches, apples, grapes and walnuts. Stockraising included goats, hogs, turkeys and dairying. Some vineyards were planted in the 1870s by European Americans but the first in the state were established in the 18th century by Spanish missionaries.
According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 1,329 square miles (3,440 km2), of which 1,256 square miles (3,250 km2) is land and 73 square miles (190 km2) (5.5%) is water. Two main watercourses drain the county: Cache Creek, which is the outlet of Clear Lake; and Putah Creek. Both of these flow to the Sacramento River. The main streams which flow into Clear Lake are Forbes Creek, Scotts Creek, Middle Creek and Kelsey Creek. At the extreme north of the county Lake Pillsbury and the Van Arsdale Reservoir dam the Eel River, providing water and power to Ukiah in Mendocino County.
The 2010 United States Census reported that Lake County had a population of 64,665. The racial makeup of Lake County was 52,033 (80.5%) White, 1,232 (1.9%) African American, 2,049 (3.2%) Native American, 724 (1.1%) Asian, 108 (0.2%) Pacific Islander, 5,455 (8.4%) from other races, and 3,064 (4.7%) from two or more races.
Hispanic or Latino of any race were 11,088 persons (17.1%).
A re-emergence of Lake County’s wine industry began in the 1960s when a few growers rediscovered the area’s grape-growing potential and began planting vineyards. Several Lake County American Viticultural Areas, such as High Valley AVA and Red Hills Lake County AVA, have been recognized as having distinct character.
The area has increased vineyards from fewer than 100 acres in 1965 to more than 9,455 acres of vineyard in 2015 (a 7.6 percent increase over 2014).
Lake County has been consistently ranked by the American Lung Association as having the cleanest air in the nation, including in 2013, 2014 and 2015.
Lake County has also been ranked twenty-four times as having the cleanest air in California.

Clearlake

Area
Total: 10.581 sq mi
Land: 10.129 sq mi
Water: 0.452 sq mi

Population (2010)
Total: 15,250
Density: 1,400/sq mi

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Hidden Valley Lake

Area
Total: 9.888 sq mi
Land: 9.734 sq mi
Water: 0.154 sq mi

Population (2010)
Total: 5,579
Density: 560/sq mi

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Lakeport

Area
Total: 3.198 sq mi
Land: 3.058 sq mi
Water: 0.140 sq mi

Population (2010)
Total: 4,753
Density: 1,500/sq mi

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Kelseyville

Area
Total: 2.891 sq mi
Land: 2.885 sq mi
Water: 0.006 sq mi

Population (2010)
Total: 3,353
Density: 1,200/sq mi

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San Diego county, Southern California 2016-12-18T10:59:08-08:00

Choose your city in San Diego county, California!

San Diego County became part of the United States as a result of the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo in 1848, ending the U.S.-Mexican War. This treaty designated the new border as terminating at a point on the Pacific Ocean coast which would result in the border passing one Spanish league south of the southernmost portion of San Diego Bay, thus ensuring that the United States received all of this natural harbor.
San Diego County was one of the original counties of California, and it was created at the time of California statehood in 1850.
According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 4,526 square miles (11,720 km2), of which 4,207 square miles (10,900 km2) is land and 319 square miles (830 km2) (7.0%) is water.[16] The county is larger in area than the combined states of Rhode Island and Delaware. San Diego County has a varied topography. On its western side is 70 miles (110 km) of coastline. Most of San Diego between the coast and the Laguna Mountains consists of hills, mesas, and small canyons. Snow-capped (in winter) mountains rise to the northeast, with the Sonoran Desert to the far east.
The 2010 United States Census reported that San Diego County had a population of 3,095,313. The racial makeup of San Diego County was 1,981,442 (64.0%) White, 158,213 (5.1%) African American, 26,340 (0.9%) Native American, 336,091 (10.9%) Asian (4.7% Filipino, 1.6% Chinese, 1.4% Vietnamese, 3.2% Other Asian), 15,337 (0.5%) Pacific Islander, 419,465 (13.6%) from other races, and 158,425 (5.0%) from two or more races.
Hispanic or Latino of any race were 991,348 persons (32.0%).
According to the 2000 Census, the median income for a household in the county was $47,067, and the median income for a family was $53,438. Males had a median income of $36,952 versus $30,356 for females. The per capita income for the county was $22,926. About 8.9% of families and 12.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 16.5% of those under age 18 and 6.8% of those age 65 or over.
Arising from an effort by the state government to identify regional economies, San Diego County and Imperial County are part of the Southern Border Region, one of nine such regions. As a regional economy, the Southern Border Region is the smallest but most economically diverse region in the state. However, the two counties maintain weak relations and have little in common aside from their common border.

San Diego

San Diego

Area
Total: 372.40 sq mi
Land: 325.19 sq mi
Water: 47.21 sq mi

Population (2015)
Total: 1,394,928
Density: 4,003/sq mi

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Oceanside

Oceanside

Area
Total: 42.174 sq mi
Land: 41.235 sq mi
Water: 0.939 sq mi

Population (2010)
Total: 167,086
Density: 4,000/sq mi

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Escondido

Escondido

Area
Total: 36.989 sq mi
Land: 36.813 sq mi
Water: 0.176 sq mi

Population (2010)
Total: 143,911
Density: 3,900/sq mi

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Fallbrook

Fallbrook

Area
Total: 17.561 sq mi
Land: 17.528 sq mi
Water: 0.033 sq mi

Population (2010)
Total: 30,534
Density: 1,700/sq mi

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Merced county, Southern California 2016-12-18T12:53:30-08:00

Choose your city in Merced county, California!

The county derives its name from the Merced River, or El Río de Nuestra Señora de la Merced (River of Our Lady of Mercy), named in 1806 by an expedition headed by Gabriel Moraga, which came upon it at the end of a hot dusty ride on the El Camino Viejo across the San Joaquin Valley in Spanish colonial Las Californias Province.
According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 1,979 square miles (5,130 km2), of which 1,935 square miles (5,010 km2) is land and 44 square miles (110 km2) (2.2%) is water.
National protected areas:
– Merced National Wildlife Refuge
– San Luis National Wildlife Refuge
The 2010 United States Census reported that Merced County had a population of 255,793. The racial makeup of Merced County was 148,381 (58.0%) White, 9,926 (3.9%) African American, 3,473 (1.4%) Native American, 18,836 (7.4%) Asian, 583 (0.2%) Pacific Islander, 62,665 (24.5%) from other races, and 11,929 (4.7%) from two or more races.
Hispanic or Latino of any race were 140,485 persons (54.9%).
– Merced County Transit, or “The Bus,” provides local service in Merced as well as connecting service between most cities in Merced County.
– The University of California, Merced, operates its own transit system, Cat Tracks. This system connects with Merced County Transit.
– Yosemite Area Regional Transportation System, or YARTS, connects Merced with Yosemite National Park.
– Greyhound buses and Amtrak trains provide long-distance intercity service.
Merced Regional Airport, located two miles (3 km) southwest of downtown Merced, provides passenger air service. General aviation airports in the county include Castle Airport, Gustine Airport, and Los Banos Municipal Airport.

Merced

Merced

Area
Total: 23.316 sq mi
Land: 23.316 sq mi
Water: 0 sq mi

Population (2010)
Total: 78,958
Density: 3,400/sq mi

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Los Banos

Los Banos

Area
Total: 10.117 sq mi
Land: 9.993 sq mi
Water: 0.124 sq mi

Population (2010)
Total: 35,972
Density: 3,600/sq mi

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Atwater

Atwater

Area
Total: 6.096 sq mi
Land: 6.087 sq mi
Water: 0.009 sq mi

Population (2010)
Total: 28,168
Density: 4,600/sq mi

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Winton

Winton

Area
Total: 3.041 sq mi
Land: 3.041 sq mi
Water: 0 sq mi

Population (2010)
Total: 10,613
Density: 3,500/sq mi

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Santa Cruz county, Southern California 2016-12-19T14:18:07-08:00

Choose your city in Santa Cruz county, California!

Santa Cruz County was one of the original counties of California, created in 1850 at the time of statehood. In the original act, the county was given the name of “Branciforte” after the Spanish pueblo founded there in 1797. A major watercourse in the county, Branciforte Creek, still bears this name. Less than two months later on April 5, 1850, the name was changed to “Santa Cruz” (“Holy Cross”).
According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 607 square miles (1,570 km2), of which 445 square miles (1,150 km2) is land and 162 square miles (420 km2) (27%) is water. It is the second-smallest county in California by land area and third-smallest by total area. Of California’s counties, only San Francisco is physically smaller.
The county is situated on a wide coastline with over 29 miles (47 km) of beaches. It is a strip of about 10 miles (16 km) wide between the coast and the crest of the Santa Cruz Mountains at the northern end of the Monterey Bay.
The 2010 United States Census reported that Santa Cruz County had a population of 262,382.
The racial makeup of Santa Cruz County was 190,208 (72.5%) White, 2,766 (1.1%) African American, 2,253 (0.9%) Native American, 11,112 (4.2%) Asian, 349 (0.1%) Pacific Islander, 43,376 (16.5%) from other races, and 12,318 (4.7%) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 84,092 persons (32.0%).
Today, it is a strongly Democratic county in presidential and congressional elections. The last Republican to carry the county was Ronald Reagan in 1980, and the last Republican to win a majority in the county was Richard Nixon in 1968. The last Republican to represent a significant portion of Santa Cruz in Congress was Burt L. Talcott, who was defeated in 1976 by Leon Panetta.
In 2008, 71.4% of voters in Santa Cruz County voted against Proposition 8, which amended the California Constitution to ban same-gender marriages.
Four-year universities:
University of California, Santa Cruz (public) in Santa Cruz, California
Bethany University (private, now defunct) in Scotts Valley, California
Two-year college:
Cabrillo College (public) in Aptos, California

Santa Cruz

Santa Cruz

Area
Total: 15.828 sq mi
Land: 12.740 sq mi
Water: 3.088 sq mi

Population (2010)
Total: 59,946
Density: 3,800/sq mi

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Watsonville

Watsonville

Area
Total: 6.783 sq mi
Land: 6.687 sq mi
Water: 0.096 sq mi

Population (2010)
Total: 51,199
Density: 7,500/sq mi

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Scotts Valley

Scotts Valley

Area
Total: 4.595 sq mi
Land: 4.595 sq mi
Water: 0 sq mi

Population (2010)
Total: 11,580
Density: 2,500/sq mi

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Aptos

Aptos

Area
Total: 6.354 sq mi
Land: 6.354 sq mi
Water: 0 sq mi

Population (2010)
Total: 6,220
Density: 980/sq mi

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Butte county, Southern California 2016-12-19T17:57:32-08:00

Choose your city in Butte county, California!

Butte County comprises the Chico, CA Metropolitan Statistical Area. It is in the California Central Valley, north of the state capital of Sacramento. Butte County is known as the “Land of Natural Wealth and Beauty.”
Butte County is watered by the Feather River and the Sacramento River. Butte Creek and Big Chico Creek are additional perennial streams, both tributary to the Sacramento. The county is the home of California State University, Chico and of Butte College.
According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 1,677 square miles (4,340 km2), of which 1,636 square miles (4,240 km2) is land and 41 square miles (110 km2) (2.4%) is water.
The county is drained by the Feather River and Butte Creek. Part of the county’s western border is formed by the Sacramento River. The county lies along the western slope of the Sierra Nevada, the steep slopes making it prime territory for the siting of hydroelectric power plants. About a half dozen of these plants are located in the county.
The 2010 United States Census reported that Butte County had a population of 220,000.
The racial makeup of Butte County was 180,096 (81.9%) White, 3,415 (1.6%) African American, 4,395 (2.0%) Native American, 9,057 (4.1%) Asian, 452 (0.2%) Pacific Islander, 12,141 (5.5%) from other races, and 10,444 (4.7%) from two or more races.
Hispanic or Latino of any race were 31,116 persons (14.1%).
There are roughly 90 public schools in the county according to the National Center for Educational Statistics. The schools are operated by the County Office of Education and 15 school districts.
Butte Regional Transit or the B-Line, provides service in and between Chico, Oroville, Paradise, Gridley and Biggs. Chico is also a connection point for Glenn Ride buses to Glenn County and Plumas Transit Systems buses to Plumas County.
Greyhound buses stop in Chico.
General Aviation airports in Butte County include: Chico Municipal Airport, Oroville Municipal Airport, Paradise Airport, Ranchaero Airport, Richvale Airport.

Chico

Chico

Area
Total: 33.095 sq mi
Land: 32.923 sq mi
Water: 0.172 sq mi

Population (2010)
Total: 86,187
Density: 2,600/sq mi

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Paradise

Paradise

Area
Total: 18.322 sq mi
Land: 18.308 sq mi
Water: 0.014 sq mi

Population (2010)
Total: 26,218
Density: 1,400/sq mi

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Oroville

Oroville

Area
Total: 13.011 sq mi
Land: 12.993 sq mi
Water: 0.018 sq mi

Population (2010)
Total: 16,061
Density: 1,200/sq mi

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Magalia

Magalia

Area
Total: 14.019 sq mi
Land: 14.015 sq mi
Water: 0.004 sq mi

Population (2010)
Total: 11,310
Density: 810/sq mi

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San Luis Obispo county, Southern California 2016-12-19T22:09:36-08:00

Choose your city in San Luis Obispo county, California!

The prehistory of San Luis Obispo County is strongly influenced by the Chumash people who had significant settlement here at least as early as the Millingstone Horizon thousands of years before the present age. Important settlements existed, for example, in many coastal areas such as Morro Bay and Los Osos.
Mission San Luis Obispo de Tolosa was founded on September 1, 1772 in the area that is now the city of San Luis Obispo.
According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 3,616 square miles (9,370 km2), of which 3,299 square miles (8,540 km2) is land and 317 square miles (820 km2) (8.8%) is water.
The 2010 United States Census reported that San Luis Obispo County had a population of 269,637. The racial makeup of San Luis Obispo County was 222,756 (82.6%) White, 5,550 (2.1%) African American, 2,536 (0.9%) Native American, 8,507 (3.2%) Asian (1.0% Filipino, 0.6% Chinese, 0.4% Japanese, 0.3% Indian, 0.3% Korean, 0.2% Vietnamese), 389 (0.1%) Pacific Islander, 19,786 (7.3%) from other races, and 10,113 (3.8%) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 55,973 persons (20.8%); 17.7% of San Luis Obispo County is Mexican, 0.3% Puerto Rican, and 0.2% Salvadoran.
San Luis Obispo County’s economy is primarily a service economy. Service jobs account for 38% of the County’s jobs, government jobs accounts for 20.7%, and manufacturing jobs represent 6% of the County’s jobs.
San Luis Obispo County, as a whole, leans toward the Republican Party in presidential and congressional elections; it has, however, become somewhat more Democratic during the 2000s and 2010s. In 2008, Barack Obama won the county with 51.2 percent of the vote. Prior to 2008, the last Democrat to win a majority in the county was Lyndon Johnson in 1964, although Bill Clinton won a plurality in 1992. In 2012, Obama again won the county, this time with a slim plurality of the vote.

San Luis Obispo

San Luis Obispo

Area
Total: 12.930 sq mi
Land: 12.777 sq mi
Water: 0.153 sq mi

Population (2010)
Total: 45,119
Density: 3,500/sq mi

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Paso Robles

Paso Robles

Area
Total: 19.425 sq mi
Land: 19.120 sq mi
Water: 0.305 sq mi

Population (2010)
Total: 29,793
Density: 1,500/sq mi

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Atascadero

Atascadero

Area
Total: 26.130 sq mi
Land: 25.641 sq mi
Water: 0.489 sq mi

Population (2010)
Total: 28,310
Density: 1,100/sq mi

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Arroyo Grande

Arroyo Grande

Area
Total: 5.835 sq mi
Land: 5.835 sq mi
Water: 0 sq mi

Population (2010)
Total: 17,716
Density: 3,000/sq mi

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Nipomo

Nipomo

Area
Total: 14.852 sq mi
Land: 14.852 sq mi
Water: 0 sq mi

Population (2010)
Total: 16,714
Density: 1,100/sq mi

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Morro Bay

Morro Bay

Area
Total: 10.322 sq mi
Land: 5.303 sq mi
Water: 5.019 sq mi

Population (2010)
Total: 10,234
Density: 990/sq mi

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Pismo Beach

Pismo Beach

Area
Total: 13.476 sq mi
Land: 3.599 sq mi
Water: 9.877 sq mi

Population (2010)
Total: 7,655
Density: 570/sq mi

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Cambria

Cambria

Area
Total: 8.508 sq mi
Land: 8.508 sq mi
Water: 0 sq mi

Population (2010)
Total: 6,032
Density: 710/sq mi

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Monterey county, California 2016-12-19T23:53:20-08:00

Choose your city in Monterey county, California!

Monterey County was one of the original counties of California, created in 1850 at the time of statehood. Parts of the county were given to San Benito County in 1874. The area was originally populated by Ohlone, Salinan & Esselen tribes.
The county derived its name from Monterey Bay. The bay was named by Sebastián Vizcaíno in 1602 in honor of the Conde de Monterrey (or Count of Monterrey), then the Viceroy of New Spain.
According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 3,771 square miles (9,770 km2), of which 3,281 square miles (8,500 km2) is land and 491 square miles (1,270 km2) (13%) is water.
The county is roughly 1.5 times larger than the state of Delaware, and roughly similar in population and size to Santa Barbara County.
The 2010 United States Census reported that Monterey County had a population of 415,057. The racial makeup of Monterey County was 230,717 (55.6%) White, 12,785 (3.1%) African American, 5,464 (1.3%) Native American, 25,258 (6.1%) Asian (2.8% Filipino, 0.7% Korean, 0.6% Chinese, 0.6% Japanese, 0.4% Vietnamese, 0.4% Indian), 2,071 (0.5%) Pacific Islander, 117,405 (28.3%) from other races, and 21,357 (5.1%) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 230,003 persons (55.4%); 50.2% of Monterey County is Mexican, 0.8% Salvadoran, and 0.5% Puerto Rican.
At the local level, Monterey County is governed by the Monterey County Board of Supervisors. Like all governing bodies in California, the Monterey County Board of Supervisors is empowered with both legislative and executive authority over the entirety of Monterey County and is the primary governing body for all unincorporated areas within the County boundaries. The Board has five elected members, each of whom represents one of five districts. Taken together, the five districts comprise the entirety of the county.
As of December 2005, Monterey County ranked among America’s ten most expensive counties, with Santa Barbara County topping the list with a median home price of $753,790. In Monterey County, the median home price was $699,900. In the northern, more densely populated part in the county, the median home price was even higher, at $712,500, making it the fourth most expensive housing market in California. The disparity between the median household income of roughly $48,305 and the median home price of $700k has been cause for recent concern over excluding potential home buyers from the market. The end of the United States housing bubble has caused prices to drop substantially, with median home prices having fallen to $280,000 as at September 2008.

Salinas

Salinas

Area
Total: 23.217 sq mi
Land: 23.179 sq mi
Water: 0.038 sq mi

Population (2010)
Total: 150,441
Density: 6,500/sq mi

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Monterey

Monterey

Area
Total: 11.764 sq mi
Land: 8.466 sq mi
Water: 3.298 sq mi

Population (2010)
Total: 27,810
Density: 2,400/sq mi

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Carmel Valley Village

Carmel Valley Village

Area
Total: 19.179 sq mi
Land: 18.983 sq mi
Water: 0.196 sq mi

Population (2010)
Total: 4,407
Density: 230/sq mi

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Pebble Beach

Pebble Beach

Area
Rancho El Pescadero:
Established late 18th Century
Elevation: 0 ft (0 m)

ZIP Code
93953
Area code: 831

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San Mateo county, California 2016-12-20T14:33:44-08:00

Choose your city in San Mateo county, California!

San Mateo County was formed in 1856 after San Francisco County, one of the state’s 18 original counties since California’s statehood in 1850, was split apart. Until 1856, San Francisco’s city limits extended west to Divisadero Street and Castro Street, and south to 20th Street. In response to the lawlessness and vigilantism that escalated rapidly between 1855 and 1856, the California government decided to divide the county.
According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 741 square miles (1,920 km2), of which 448 square miles (1,160 km2) is land and 293 square miles (760 km2) (40%) is water. It is the third-smallest county in California by land area. A number of bayside watercourses drain the eastern part of the county including San Bruno Creek and Colma Creek. Streams draining the western county include Frenchmans Creek, Pilarcitos Creek, Naples Creek, Arroyo de en Medio, and Denniston Creek.
The 2010 United States Census reported that San Mateo County had a population of 718,451. The racial makeup of San Mateo County was 383,535 (53.4%) White, 20,436 (2.8%) African American, 3,306 (0.5%) Native American, 178,118 (24.8%) Asian (9.8% Filipino, 9.0% Chinese, 1.9% Indian, 1.2% Japanese, 0.8% Korean, 0.5% Vietnamese, 0.3% Burmese, 0.1% Pakistani), 10,317 (1.4%) Pacific Islander (0.6% Tongan, 0.3% Samoan, 0.2% Fijian, 0.1% Native Hawaiian), 84,529 (11.8%) from other races, and 38,210 (5.3%) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 182,502 persons (25.4%); 15.7% of San Mateo County is Mexican, 2.7% Salvadoran, 1.2% Guatemalan, 1.2% Nicaraguan, 0.7% Peruvian, 0.6% Puerto Rican, 0.2% Colombian, and 0.2% Cuban.
San Mateo County has a five-member Board of Supervisors, representing five geographic districts, elected at-large until November 2012. On November 6, 2012, Measure B passed to amend the San Mateo County Charter so that each member of the Board of Supervisors will cease to be elected by an at-large vote of all the voters in the County, but is instead elected only by the voters of his or her district.
San Mateo County is split between California’s 14th and 18th congressional districts, represented by Jackie Speier (D–Hillsborough) and Anna Eshoo (D–Atherton), respectively.
A July 2013 Wall Street Journal article identified the Facebook initial public offering (IPO) as the cause of a change in the U.S.’ national economic statistics, as San Mateo County—the home of the company—became the top wage-earning county in the country after the fourth quarter of 2012. The article revealed that the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported that the average weekly wage in the county was US$3,240, which is 107% higher than the previous year: “That’s the equivalent of $168,000 a year, and more than 50% higher than the next highest county, New York County (better known as Manhattan), which came in at $2,107 a week, or roughly $110,000 a year.”

San Mateo

San Mateo

Area
Total: 15.884 sq mi
Land: 12.130 sq mi
Water: 3.754 sq mi

Population (2010)
Total: 97,207
Density: 8,536/sq mi

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Redwood City

Redwood City

Area
Total: 34.625 sq mi
Land: 19.420 sq mi
Water: 15.205 sq mi

Population (2010)
Total: 76,815
Density: 4,392/sq mi

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Pacifica

Pacifica

Area
Total: 12.660 sq mi
Land: 12.658 sq mi
Water: 0.002 sq mi

Population (2010)
Total: 37,234
Density: 2,900/sq mi

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Menlo Park

Menlo Park

Area
Total: 17.415 sq mi
Land: 9.790 sq mi
Water: 7.625 sq mi

Population (2010)
Total: 32,026
Density: 3,402/sq mi

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Santa Clara county, California 2016-12-20T16:57:04-08:00

Choose your city in Santa Clara county, California!

Santa Clara County was one of the original counties of California, formed in 1850 at the time of statehood. The original inhabitants included the Ohlone, residing on Coyote Creek and Calaveras Creek. Part of the county’s territory was given to Alameda County in 1853. In 1882, Santa Clara County tried to levy taxes upon property of the Southern Pacific Railroad within county boundaries. The result was the U.S. Supreme Court case of Santa Clara County v. Southern Pacific Railroad, 118 U.S. 394 (1886), in which the Court extended Due Process rights to artificial legal entities.
According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 1,304 square miles (3,380 km2), of which 1,290 square miles (3,300 km2) is land and 14 square miles (36 km2) (1.1%) is water.
The San Andreas Fault runs along the Santa Cruz Mountains in the south and west of the county.
The 2010 United States Census reported that Santa Clara County had a population of 1,781,642. The ethnic makeup of Santa Clara County was 836,616 (47.0%) White, 46,428 (2.6%) African American, 12,960 (0.7%) Native American, 570,524 (32.0%) Asian (8.6% Chinese, 7.1% Vietnamese, 6.6% Indian, 4.9% Filipino, 1.6% Korean, 1.4% Japanese, 0.3% Cambodian, 0.3% Pakistani, 0.1% Thai, 0.1% Laotian, 0.1% Burmese, 0.1% Indonesian, 0.1% Bangladeshi), 7,060 (0.4%) Pacific Islander (0.1% Samoan, 0.1% Guamanian, 0.1% Tongan, 0.1% Native Hawaiian), 220,806 (12.4%) from other races, and 87,248 (4.9%) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 479,210 persons (26.9%): 22.5% Mexican, 0.4% Puerto Rican, 0.1% Cuban, 3.8% Other Hispanic.
Santa Clara County has five elected supervisors, elected within their districts.
The county is one among three counties in California (with Napa and Madera) to establish a separate department, the Santa Clara County Department of Corrections, to deal with corrections pursuant to California Government Code §23013.
The county also pays the $340,000 salary and benefits of the California state Department of Social Services director, which is reimbursed by the state, skirting the $165,000 state law cap for the position.
The Nature Conservancy “Mount Hamilton Project” has acquired or put under conservation easement 100,000 acres (40,000 ha) of land towards its 500,000 acres (200,000 ha) goal for habitat conservation within a 1,200,000 acres (490,000 ha) area encompassing much of eastern Santa Clara County as well as portions of southern Alameda County, western Merced and Stanislaus Counties, and northern San Benito County.

San Jose

San Jose

Area
Total: 179.97 sq mi
Land: 176.526 sq mi
Water: 3.439 sq mi

Population (2010)
Total: 1,026,908
Density: 5,700/sq mi

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Gilroy

Gilroy

Area
Total: 16.156 sq mi
Land: 16.146 sq mi
Water: 0.010 sq mi

Population (2010)
Total: 48,821
Density: 3,000/sq mi

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Morgan Hill

Morgan Hill

Area
Total: 12.882 sq mi
Land: 12.882 sq mi
Water: 0 sq mi

Population (2010)
Total: 37,882
Density: 2,900/sq mi

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Los Gatos

Los Gatos

Area
Total: 11.160 sq mi
Land: 11.080 sq mi
Water: 0.080 sq mi

Population (2010)
Total: 29,413
Density: 2,600/sq mi

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